Facebook
gallery/1 logo (site)_em_englishmag (max) rgb

Выберите язык

vk.com
Cart (0)
EnglishMag logo
choose language

We are happy to announce that we are starting a new section with great TED videos! If you are searching for inspiration, so that is the best place for you! To higher up your English vocabulary all the TED speeches you can read in English and Russian!

TED videos and English-Russian scripts 

gallery/знак первода под вопросом comic sans

Мы рады сообщить, что мы начинаем новый раздел с отличными видео от TED! Если вы ищете вдохновение, это лучшее место для вас! Чтобы поднять ваш английский словарный запас, все речи TED вы можете прочитать на английском и русском языках!

00:07
In 2012,
00:08
a team of Japanese and Danish researchers set a world record,
00:13
transmitting 1 petabit of data—
00:15
that’s 10,000 hours of high-def video—
00:19
over a fifty-kilometer cable, in a second.
00:22
This wasn’t just any cable.
00:24
It was a souped-up version of fiber optics—
00:27
the hidden network that links our planet
00:29
and makes the internet possible.
00:32
For decades,
00:33
long-distance communications between cities and countries
00:36
were carried by electrical signals,
00:38
in wires made of copper.
00:40
This was slow and inefficient,
00:42
with metal wires limiting data rates and power lost as wasted heat.
00:47
But in the late 20th century,
00:49
engineers mastered a far superior method of transmission.
00:53
Instead of metal,
00:55
glass can be carefully melted and drawn into flexible fiber strands,
01:00
hundreds of kilometers long and no thicker than human hair.
01:04
And instead of electricity,
01:06
these strands carry pulses of light, representing digital data.
01:11
But how does light travel within glass, rather than just pass through it?
01:16
The trick lies in a phenomenon known as total internal reflection.
01:21
Since Isaac Newton’s time,
01:23
lensmakers and scientists have known that light bends
01:26
when it passes between air and materials like water or glass.
01:31
When a ray of light inside glass hits its surface at a steep angle,
01:36
it refracts, or bends as it exits into air.
01:39
But if the ray travels at a shallow angle,
01:42
it’ll bend so far that it stays trapped,
01:46
bouncing along inside the glass.
01:48
Under the right condition,
01:50
something normally transparent to light can instead hide it from the world.
01:55
Compared to electricity or radio,
01:57
fiber optic signals barely degrade over great distances—
02:01
a little power does scatter away,
02:04
and fibers can’t bend too sharply,
02:06
otherwise the light leaks out.
02:08
Today, a single optical fiber carries many wavelengths of light,
02:12
each a different channel of data.
02:15
And a fiber optic cable contains hundreds of these fiber strands.
02:19
Over a million kilometers of cable crisscross our ocean floors
02:23
to link the continents—
02:25
that’s enough to wind around the Equator nearly thirty times.
02:29
With fiber optics,
02:30
distance hardly limits data,
02:32
which has allowed the internet to evolve into a planetary computer.
02:36
Increasingly,
02:37
our mobile work and play rely on legions of overworked computer servers,
02:43
warehoused in gigantic data centers flung across the world.
02:47
This is called cloud computing,
02:49
and it leads to two big problems:
02:51
heat waste and bandwidth demand.
02:54
The vast majority of internet traffic shuttles around inside data centers,
02:58
where thousands of servers are connected by traditional electrical cables.
03:03
Half of their running power is wasted as heat.
03:06
Meanwhile, wireless bandwidth demand steadily marches on,
03:10
and the gigahertz signals used in our mobile devices
03:13
are reaching their data delivery limits.
03:16
It seems fiber optics has been too good for its own good,
03:19
fueling overly-ambitious cloud and mobile computing expectations.
03:24
But a related technology, integrated photonics, has come to the rescue.
03:29
Light can be guided not only in optical fibers,
03:32
but also in ultrathin silicon wires.
03:36
Silicon wires don’t guide light as well as fiber.
03:39
But they do enable engineers to shrink
03:42
all the devices in a hundred kilometer fiber optic network
03:45
down to tiny photonic chips that plug into servers
03:49
and convert their electrical signals to optical and back.
03:53
These electricity-to-light chips allow for wasteful electrical cables in data centers
03:59
to be swapped out for power-efficient fiber.
04:02
Photonic chips can help break open wireless bandwidth limitations, too.
04:07
Researchers are working to replace mobile gigahertz signals
04:10
with terahertz frequencies,
04:12
to carry data thousands of times faster.
04:15
But these are short-range signals:
04:17
they get absorbed by moisture in the air,
04:19
or blocked by tall buildings.
04:21
With tiny wireless-to-fiber photonic transmitter chips
04:25
distributed throughout cities,
04:27
terahertz signals can be relayed over long-range distances.
04:31
They can do so via a stable middleman,
04:34
optical fiber, and make hyperfast wireless connectivity a reality.
04:39
For all of human history,
04:41
light has gifted us with sight and heat,
04:43
serving as a steady companion while we explored and settled the physical world.
04:49
Now, we’ve saddled light with information and redirected it
04:52
to run along a fiber optic super highway—
04:55
with many different integrated photonic exits—
04:59
to build an even more expansive, virtual world.

0:00:07
В 2012 году

0:00:08
группа японских и датских учёных установила мировой рекорд,

0:00:13
передав за одну секунду

0:00:15
по пятидесятикилометровому кабелю один петабит данных,

0:00:19
что составляет 10 000 часов видео высокого разрешения.

0:00:22
Это был не обычный кабель,

0:00:24
а усовершенствованная версия оптоволокна,

0:00:27
скрытой сети, опутывающей земной шар,

0:00:29
благодаря которой существует интернет.

0:00:32
Много лет

0:00:33
связь на дальние расстояния между городами и

странами

0:00:36
осуществлялась посредством электрического тока

0:00:38
по медным проводам.

0:00:40
Это было медленно и неэффективно

0:00:42
из-за ограничений по скорости
и потерь энергии в виде тепла в металлических проводах.

0:00:47
Но в конце XX века

0:00:49
инженеры значительно улучшили способ

передачи данных.

0:00:53
Вместо металла стало возможно

0:00:55
использовать тонко расплавленное стекло вытянутое в гибкие волокна

0:01:00
длиной в сотни километров и тоньше человеческого волоса.

0:01:04
А вместо электричества

0:01:06
эти волокна способны передавать цифровые данные в виде импульсов света.

0:01:11 
Но как удержать свет внутри стекла чтобы он не выходил наружу?

0:01:16
Хитрость заключается в использовании полного внутреннего отражения.

0:01:21
Со времён Исаака Ньютона

0:01:23
изготовители линз и учёные знали, что свет меняет направление при прохождении 

0:01:26
через такие материалы, как вода или стекло.

0:01:31
Когда луч света внутри стекла падает на его поверхность под крутым углом,

0:01:36
он меняет направление, или преломляется, на выходе в воздух.

0:01:39
Но если луч падает полого (под слабым углом),

0:01:42
то преломляется настолько,

0:01:46
что остаётся пойманным внутри стекла.

0:01:48
При определённых условиях вещество, обычно пропускающее свет,

0:01:52
способно изолировать его от окружающего мира.

0:01:55
По сравнению с электричеством или радио

0:01:57 
оптоволоконные сигналы практически не затухают на больших расстояниях

0:02:01 
в силу малых потерь энергии,

0:02:04
и волокна нельзя слишком сильно согнуть,

0:02:06
иначе свет просочится наружу.

0:02:08 
В наше время одно оптоволокно несёт набор световых волн различной длины

0:02:12 
с отдельным каналом данных на каждой.

0:02:15 
И оптоволоконный кабель состоит из сотен таких

волокон.

0:02:19 
По дну океанов вдоль и поперёк проложено более миллиона километров кабеля,

0:02:23
связывающего континенты.

0:02:25
Этого почти достаточно тридцать раз обмотать экватор.

0:02:29
С оптоволокном

0:02:30
расстояние мало влияет на время передачи данных,

0:02:33
и интернет стал одним компьютером поистине планетарного масштаба.

0:02:36
Всё больше и больше постоянная доступность нашей работы и отдыха

0:02:40
зависит от множества перегруженных компьютерных серверов

0:02:43
в разбросанных по всему миру гигантских центрах хранения и обработки данных.

0:02:47
Это называется облачными вычислениями

0:02:49
и создаёт две большие проблемы:

0:02:51
тепловые отходы и гонку за пропускной способностью.

0:02:54
Сетевой трафик в основном идёт внутри центров обработки и хранения данных,

0:02:58
где тысячи серверов соединены обычными электрическими кабелями.

0:03:03
Половина их рабочей мощности теряется как нагревается.

0:03:06
При этом спрос на пропускную способность беспроводной связи постоянно растёт,

0:03:10
и гигагерцовые сигналы, используемые в мобильных устройствах,
приближаются к пределам скорости передачи данных.

0:03:16
Может показаться, что оптоволокно оказалось слишком хорошим себе же во вред,

0:03:20
породив завышенные ожидания в области облачных и мобильных вычислений.

0:03:24
Но на выручку пришла смежная технология интегральной фотоники.

0:03:29
Свет может направляться не только по оптоволокну,

0:03:32
но и по ультратонким кремниевым проводам.

0:03:36
Кремниевые провода проводят свет не так хорошо, как оптоволокно.

0:03:39
Но зато они позволяют инженерам ужать

0:03:42
все устройства в стокилометровой оптоволоконной сети

0:03:45
до крошечных фотонных микросхем, которые подключаются к серверам

0:03:49
и преобразуют электр. сигналы в оптические и наоборот.

0:03:53
Электросветовые трансформаторы заменяют неэкономные электрические кабели в центрах хранения и обработки 

0:03:59
на энергосберегающее волокно.

0:04:02
Фотонные микросхемы могут ещё и улучшить пропускную способность беспроводной сети.

0:04:07
Учёные работают над переводом мобильных сигналов

0:04:10
с гига- на терагерцовые частоты,

0:04:12
что позволит ускорить передачу данных в тысячи раз.

0:04:15 
Но это сигналы короткого радиуса действия:

0:04:17 
они поглощаются влагой в воздухе,

0:04:19
или же блокируются высокими зданиями.

0:04:21
Микросхемы беспроводных фотонных передатчиков,

0:04:25
распределённые по городам,

0:04:27
позволят транслировать терагерцовые сигналы на большие расстояния.

0:04:31
Это станет возможным благодаря надёжному посреднику — оптоволокну,

0:04:34
и тогда сверхбыстрая беспроводная связь станет реальностью.

0:04:39
На протяжении всей истории человечества

0:04:41.303,0:04:43.893
свет нёс нам способность видеть и дарил нам тепло

0:04:43
и был верным партнёром в исследовании и освоении физического мира.

0:04:49
Теперь мы снабдили свет информацией

и за​​пустили его

0:04:52
по сверхскоростному оптоволоконному «шоссе»

0:04:55
со множеством ответвлений на интегральной фотонике,

0:04:59
чтобы ещё больше раздвинуть границы виртуального мира.

The hidden network that makes the internet possible

gallery/arrows1a up15

Listen and read the script

gallery/arrows1a down15

Explore how fiber optics uses light to transmit data over long distances, and with integrated photonics, expands our virtual world beyond the internet.


In 2012, a team of researchers set a world record, transmitting 1 petabit of data — that’s 10,000 hours of high-def video — over a fifty-kilometer cable, in a second. This wasn’t just any cable. It was a souped-up version of fiber optics, the hidden network that links our planet and makes the internet possible. What is fiber optics and how does it work? Sajan Saini explores the vital technology.


Lesson by Sajan Saini, directed by Artrake Studio.

Translation to Russian - Anton Zamaraev



gallery/знак первода под вопросом comic sans

Watch the video and answer the questions:

What are the two ways copper metal wires influence the transmission of information as electrical signals?

A data rate and distance

B distance and time

C data rate and power

D time and power

When a ray of light inside glass hits its surface at an angle, what happens to the ray when it exits into air?

A the ray continues, with no loss power

B the ray reflects

C the ray undergoes total internal reflection

D the ray bends, or refracts

What speed can data be transferred across the world wide web (www)?

gallery/2019-08-22_15-57-22

More questions and answers you can see after the script

TED Ed questions

22.08.2019