Facebook
gallery/1 logo (site)_em_englishmag (max) rgb

Выберите язык

vk.com
Cart (0)
EnglishMag logo
choose language

We are happy to announce that we are continuing our section with great TED videos! If you are searching for inspiration, so that is the best place for you! To higher up your English vocabulary all the TED speeches you can read in English and Russian!

gallery/cdn_5065

TED videos and English-Russian scripts 

gallery/знак первода под вопросом comic sans

Мы рады сообщить, что мы продолжаем наш раздел с отличными видео от TED! Если вы ищете вдохновение, это лучшее место для вас! Чтобы поднять ваш английский словарный запас, все речи TED вы можете прочитать на английском и русском языках!

Choice, happiness and spaghetti sauce, Malcolm Gladwell

gallery/arrows1a up15

Listen and read the script

gallery/arrows1a down15

Detective of fads and emerging subcultures, chronicler of jobs-you-never-knew-existed, Malcolm Gladwell's work is toppling the popular understanding of bias, crime, food, marketing, race, consumers and intelligence. 

Malcolm Gladwell searches for the counterintuitive in what we all take to be the mundane: cookies, sneakers, pasta sauce. A New Yorker staff writer since 1996, he visits obscure laboratories and infomercial set kitchens as often as the hangouts of freelance cool-hunters — a sort of pop-R&D gumshoe — and for that has become a star lecturer and bestselling author.

Enjoy watching!
 

Vocabulary

fad [fæd]  прихоть, причуда
chronicler ['krɔnɪklə] летописец

topple ['tɔpl] валить с ног

bias ['baɪəs] предубеждение

counterintuitive [ˌkauntə(r)ɪn'tjuːətɪv] парадоксальный, неожиданный


failures – the fact that smth/smb not succeeding
make sense – to be clear and easy to understand
e

gallery/знак первода под вопросом comic sans

mundane [mʌn'deɪn]  обычный, приземлённый

obscure [əb'skjuə] непонятный

infomercial [ˌɪnfəu'mɜːʃ(ə)l] тв рекламный ролик

differentiability |diferenSHəˈbiliti|  something that is distinguished from other things (отличительность)

definitely - without doubt  ['def(ə)nətli] 

gain traction — get support 

recession |rəˈseSH(ə)n| a period of temporary economic decline 

intense - of extreme force, degree, or strength

aside from - except for  (Am.E.) 

penetration [,peni'treiʃ(ə)n]  the extent to which a product is recognized and bought by customers in a particular market: the software has attained a high degree of market penetration. 

assess [ə'ses] evaluate or estimate the nature, ability, or quality of sth (оценивать)

Denial - refusal 

otherwise - in circumstances different from those present or considered, in other respects (иначе; в противном случае)

gallery/cdn_5430

00:30
I think I was supposed to talk about my new book, which is called «Blink,» and it’s about snap judgments and first impressions. 
00:38
But I was thinking about this, and I realized that although my new book makes me happy, it’s not really about happiness. So I decided instead, I would talk about someone who I think has done as much to make Americans happy as perhaps anyone over the last 20 years, a man who is a great personal hero of mine: someone by the name of Howard Moskowitz, who is most famous for reinventing spaghetti sauce.
01:07
Howard is about this high, and he’s round, and he’s in his 60s, and he has big huge glasses and thinning gray hair, and he has a kind of wonderful exuberance and by profession, he’s a psychophysicist. Now, I should tell you that I have no idea what psychophysics is, although, at some point in my life, I dated a girl for two years who was getting her doctorate in psychophysics. Which should tell you something about that relationship.
(Laughter)
01:38
But, as far as I know, psychophysics is about measuring things. And Howard is very interested in measuring things. And he graduated with his doctorate from Harvard, and he set up a little consulting shop in White Plains, New York. And one of his first clients was Pepsi. This is many years ago, back in the early 70s. And Pepsi came to Howard and they said, ‘‘You know, there’s this new thing called aspartame, and we would like to make Diet Pepsi. We’d like you to figure out how much aspartame we should put in each can of Diet Pepsi in order to have the perfect drink’’. Now that sounds like an incredibly straightforward question to answer, and that’s what Howard thought. Because Pepsi told him, «Look, we’re working with a band between 8 and 12%. Anything below eight percent sweetness is not sweet enough; anything above twelve percent sweetness is too sweet. We want to know: what’s the sweet spot between 8 and 12?» Now, if I gave you this problem to do, you would all say, it’s very simple. What we do is you make up a big experimental batch of Pepsi, at every degree of sweetness – eight percent, 8.1, 8.2, 8.3, all the way up to 12 – and we try this out with thousands of people, and we plot the results on a curve, and we take the most popular concentration, right? Really simple.
02:54    
Howard does the experiment, and he gets the data back, and he plots it on a curve, and all of a sudden he realizes it’s not a nice bell curve. In fact, the data doesn’t make any sense. It’s a mess. It’s all over the place. Now, most people in that business, in the world of testing food and such, are not dismayed when the data comes back a mess. They think, ‘‘Well, you know, figuring out what people think about cola’s not that easy’’. ‘‘You know, maybe we made an error somewhere along the way’’. ‘‘You know, let’s just make an educated guess’’, and they simply point and they go for 10 percent, right in the middle. Howard is not so easily placated. Howard is a man of a certain degree of intellectual standards. And this was not good enough for him, and this question bedeviled him for years. And he would think it through and say, ‘‘What was wrong? Why could we not make sense of this experiment with Diet Pepsi?’’
03:43
And one day, he was sitting in a diner in White Plains, about to go trying to dream up some work for Nescafé. And suddenly, like a bolt of lightning, the answer came to him. And that is, that when they analyzed the Diet Pepsi data, they were asking the wrong question. They were looking for the perfect Pepsi, and they should have been looking for the perfect Pepsis. Trust me. This was an enormous revelation. This was one of the most brilliant breakthroughs in all of food science. Howard immediately went on the road, and he would go to conferences around the country, and he would stand up and say, ‘‘You had been looking for the perfect Pepsi. You’re wrong. You should be looking for the perfect Pepsis’’. And people would look at him blankly and say, ‘‘What are you talking about? Craziness’’. And they would say, ‘‘Move! Next!’’ Tried to get business, nobody would hire him – he was obsessed, though, and he talked about it and talked about it.Howard loves the Yiddish expression ‘‘To a worm in horseradish, the world is horseradish’’. This was his horseradish.
(Laughter)
04:41
He was obsessed with it! And finally, he had a breakthrough. Vlasic Pickles came to him, and they said, ‘‘Doctor Moskowitz, we want to make the perfect pickle’’. And he said, ‘‘There is no perfect pickle; there are only perfect
pickles’’. And he came back to them and he said, ‘‘You don’t just need to improve your regular; you need to create zesty’’. And that’s where we got zesty pickles. Then the next person came to him: Campbell’s Soup. And this was even more important.
05:11
In fact, Campbell’s Soup is where Howard made his reputation. Campbell’s made Prego, and Prego, in the early 80s, was struggling next to Ragù, which was the dominant spaghetti sauce of the 70s and 80s. Now it was, technically speaking – this is an aside – Prego is a better tomato sauce than Ragù. The quality of the tomato paste is much better; the spice mix is far superior; it adheres to the pasta in a much more pleasing way. In fact, they would do the famous bowl test back in the 70s with Ragù and Prego. You’d have a plate of spaghetti, and you would pour it on, right? And the Ragù would all go to the bottom, and the Prego would sit on top. That’s called ‘‘adherence’’. And, anyway, despite the fact that they were far superior in adherence, and the quality of their tomato paste, Prego was struggling.
06:01
So they came to Howard, and they said, fix us. So he said, this is what I want to do. And he got together with the Campbell’s soup kitchen, and he made 45 varieties of spaghetti sauce. And he varied them according to every conceivable way that you can vary tomato sauce: by sweetness, by level of garlic, by tartness, by sourness, by visible solids – my favorite term in the spaghetti sauce business.
(Laughter)
06:26
Every conceivable way you can vary spaghetti sauce, he varied spaghetti sauce. And then he took this whole raft of 45 spaghetti sauces, and he went on the road...

He went to New York, to Chicago, he went to Jacksonville, to Los Angeles. And he brought in people by the truckload into big halls. And he sat them down for two hours, and over the course of that two hours, he gave them ten bowls. Ten small bowls of pasta, with a different spaghetti sauce on each one. And after they ate each bowl, they had to rate, from 0 to 100, how good they thought the spaghetti sauce was.

07:01

At the end of that process, after doing it for months and months, he had a mountain of data about how the American people feel about spaghetti sauce. And then he analyzed the data. Did he look for the most popular variety of spaghetti sauce? No! Howard doesn't believe that there is such a thing. Instead, he looked at the data, and he said, let's see if we can group all these different data points into clusters. Let's see if they congregate around certain ideas. And sure enough, if you sit down, and you analyze all this data on spaghetti sauce, you realize that all Americans fall into one of three groups. There are people who like their spaghetti sauce plain; there are people who like their spaghetti sauce spicy, and there are people who like it extra chunky.

07:45

And of those three facts, the third one was the most significant, because at the time, in the early 1980s, if you went to a supermarket, you would not find extra-chunky spaghetti sauce. And Prego turned to Howard, and they said, "You're telling me that one-third of Americans crave extra-chunky spaghetti sauce and yet no one is servicing their needs?" And he said "Yes!"

08:10

(Laughter)

And Prego then went back, and completely reformulated their spaghetti sauce, and came out with a line of extra chunky that immediately and completely took over the spaghetti sauce business in this country. And over the next 10 years, they made 600 million dollars off their line of extra-chunky sauces.

08:30

Everyone else in the industry looked at what Howard had done, and they said, "Oh my god! We've been thinking all wrong!" And that's when you started to get seven different kinds of vinegar, and 14 different kinds of mustard, and 71 different kinds of olive oil. And then eventually even Ragù hired Howard, and Howard did the exact same thing for Ragù that he did for Prego. And today, if you go to a really good supermarket, do you know how many Ragùs there are? 36! In six varieties: Cheese, Light, Robusto, Rich & Hearty, Old World Traditional -- Extra-Chunky Garden.

(Laughter)

That's Howard's doing. That is Howard's gift to the American people.

09:21

Now why is that important?

(Laughter)

It is, in fact, enormously important. I'll explain to you why. What Howard did is he fundamentally changed the way the food industry thinks about making you happy. Assumption number one in the food industry used to be that the way to find out what people want to eat, what will make people happy, is to ask them. And for years and years and years, Ragù and Prego would have focus groups, and they would sit you down, and they would say, "What do you want in a spaghetti sauce? Tell us what you want in a spaghetti sauce." And for all those years -- 20, 30 years -- through all those focus group sessions, no one ever said they wanted extra-chunky. Even though at least a third of them, deep in their hearts, actually did.


(Laughter)

10:03

People don't know what they want! As Howard loves to say, "The mind knows not what the tongue wants."It's a mystery!

(Laughter)

10:23

And a critically important step in understanding our own desires and tastes is to realize that we cannot always explain what we want, deep down. If I asked all of you, for example, in this room, what you want in a coffee, you know what you'd say? Every one of you would say, "I want a dark, rich, hearty roast." It's what people always say when you ask them. "What do you like?" "Dark, rich, hearty roast!" What percentage of you actually like a dark, rich, hearty roast? According to Howard, somewhere between 25 and 27 percent of you. Most of you like milky, weak coffee.

10:52

So that's number one thing that Howard did. Number two thing that Howard did is he made us realize -- it's another very critical point -- he made us realize the importance of what he likes to call "horizontal segmentation." Why is this critical? Because this is the way the food industry thought before Howard. What were they obsessed with in the early 80s? They were obsessed with mustard. In particular, they were obsessed with the story of Grey Poupon. Used to be, there were two mustards: French's and Gulden's. What were they? Yellow mustard. What's in it? Yellow mustard seeds, turmeric, and paprika. That was mustard. Grey Poupon came along, with a Dijon. Right? Much more volatile brown mustard seed, some white wine, a nose hit, much more delicate aromatics. And what do they do? They put it in a little tiny glass jar, with a wonderful enamelled label on it, made it look French, even though it's made in Oxnard, California.

(Laughter)

11:50

And instead of charging a dollar fifty for the eight-ounce bottle, the way that French's and Gulden's did, they decided to charge four dollars. And they had those ads. With the guy in the Rolls Royce, eating the Grey Poupon. Another pulls up, and says, "Do you have any Grey Poupon?" And the whole thing, after they did that, Grey Poupon takes off! Takes over the mustard business!

12:10

And everyone's take-home lesson from that was that the way to make people happy is to give them something that is more expensive, something to aspire to. It's to make them turn their back on what they think they like now, and reach out for something higher up the mustard hierarchy.

(Laughter)

12:32

A better mustard! A more expensive mustard! A mustard of more sophistication and culture and meaning.And Howard looked to that and said, "That's wrong!" Mustard does not exist on a hierarchy. Mustard exists, just like tomato sauce, on a horizontal plane. There is no good mustard or bad mustard. There is no perfect mustard or imperfect mustard. There are only different kinds of mustards that suit different kinds of people. He fundamentally democratized the way we think about taste. And for that, as well, we owe Howard Moskowitz a huge vote of thanks.

13:06

Third thing that Howard did, and perhaps the most important, is Howard confronted the notion of the Platonic dish.

(Laughter)

13:13

What do I mean by that?

(Laughter)

13:15

For the longest time in the food industry, there was a sense that there was one way, a perfect way, to make a dish. You go to Chez Panisse, they give you the red-tail sashimi with roasted pumpkin seeds in a something reduction. They don't give you five options on the reduction. They don't say, "Do you want the extra-chunky reduction, or ...?" No! You just get the reduction. Why? Because the chef at Chez Panisse has a Platonic notion about red-tail sashimi. "This is the way it ought to be." And she serves it that way time and time again, and if you quarrel with her, she will say, "You know what? You're wrong! This is the best way it ought to be in this restaurant."

13:59

Now that same idea fueled the commercial food industry as well. They had a Platonic notion of what tomato sauce was. And where did that come from? It came from Italy. Italian tomato sauce is what? It's blended; it's thin. The culture of tomato sauce was thin. When we talked about "authentic tomato sauce" in the 1970s, we talked about Italian tomato sauce, we talked about the earliest Ragùs, which had no visible solids, right? Which were thin, you just put a little bit and it sunk down to the bottom of the pasta. That's what it was. And why were we attached to that? Because we thought that what it took to make people happy was to provide them with the most culturally authentic tomato sauce, A. And B, we thought that if we gave them the culturally authentic tomato sauce, then they would embrace it. And that's what would please the maximum number of people.

14:50

In other words, people in the cooking world were looking for cooking universals. They were looking for one way to treat all of us. And it's good reason for them to be obsessed with the idea of universals, because all of science, through the 19th century and much of the 20th, was obsessed with universals. Psychologists, medical scientists, economists were all interested in finding out the rules that govern the way all of us behave. But that changed, right? What is the great revolution in science of the last 10, 15 years? It is the movement from the search for universals to the understanding of variability. Now in medical science, we don't want to know, necessarily, just how cancer works, we want to know how your cancer is different from my cancer. I guess my cancer different from your cancer. Genetics has opened the door to the study of human variability. What Howard Moskowitz was doing was saying, "This same revolution needs to happen in the world of tomato sauce." And for that, we owe him a great vote of thanks.

15:55

I'll give you one last illustration of variability, and that is -- oh, I'm sorry. Howard not only believed that, but he took it a second step, which was to say that when we pursue universal principles in food, we aren't just making an error; we are actually doing ourselves a massive disservice. And the example he used was coffee. And coffee is something he did a lot of work with, with Nescafé. If I were to ask all of you to try and come up with a brand of coffee -- a type of coffee, a brew -- that made all of you happy, and then I asked you to rate that coffee, the average score in this room for coffee would be about 60 on a scale of 0 to 100. If, however, you allowed me to break you into coffee clusters, maybe three or four coffee clusters, and I could make coffee just for each of those individual clusters, your scores would go from 60 to 75 or 78. The difference between coffee at 60 and coffee at 78 is a difference between coffee that makes you wince and coffee that makes you deliriously happy.

16:53

That is the final, and I think most beautiful lesson, of Howard Moskowitz: that in embracing the diversity of human beings, we will find a surer way to true happiness.

Thank you.

(Applause)

00:30

Думаю, мне следовало бы рассказывать о моей новой книге, которая называется «Озарение», она о мгновенных суждениях и первых впечатлениях.

00:38

Но я думал об этом и понял, что несмотря на то, что моя новая книга делает меня счастливым, и я думаю, сделает счастливой мою маму, она не совсем про счастье. Поэтому я решил, что вместо этого я расскажу о человеке, который, на мой взгляд, сделал для счастья американцев больше, чем, кто-либо другой за прошедшие 20 лет. Человек, который для меня лично является великим героем. Его зовут Говард Московиц и он наиболее известен тем, что заново изобрёл соус для спагетти.

01:07

Говард примерно такого роста, полный, ему седьмой десяток, носит огромные очки, у него редеющие седые волосы, он удивительно энергичен, и по профессии он специалист по психофизике. Должен вам сказать, что я понятия не имею о том, что такое психофизика, хотя в определённый период моей жизни я два года встречался с девушкой, которая получала докторскую степень по психофизике. Это должно говорить вам кое-что о тех отношениях.

(Смех)

 

01:38

Насколько мне известно психофизика изучает оценивание вещей. А Говард очень любит оценивать разные вещи. Он окончил Гарвард с докторской степенью и организовал небольшую консалтинговую контору в Уайт Плейнз, на севере штата Нью-Йорк. Одним из первых его клиентов — это было много лет назад, в начале 70-х, — была компания «Пепси». Представители «Пепси» пришли к Говарду и сказали: «Знаете, есть такая новая штука, аспартам, и мы бы хотели сделать диетическую «Пепси». Нам нужно, чтобы вы выяснили, сколько аспартама нужно положить в каждую банку диетической «Пепси», чтобы получился идеальный напиток». Этот вопрос кажется невероятно простым, так подумал и Говард. Потому что представители «Пепси» сказали ему: «Мы работаем в диапазоне между 8 и 12 процентами. Всё, что меньше 8 процентов сладости, недостаточно сладко, а всё, что больше 12, — слишком сладко. Мы хотим узнать: какой оптимальный процент сладости между 8 и 12?» Если я дам вам такую задачу, все вы скажете, что это очень просто. Нужно собрать большую экспериментальную партию «Пепси» со всеми степенями сладости: 8%, 8.1%, 8.2%, 8.3% и так до 12% — и дать её на пробу тысячам людей, нанести результаты на кривую и выбрать наиболее популярную концентрацию. Правда же? Очень просто.

 

 

 

02:54

Говард проводит эксперимент, получает данные, наносит их на кривую и неожиданно понимает, что это не похоже на нормальное распределение. На самом деле данные вообще не имеют смысла. Они в беспорядке на всём графике. Большинство людей в этом бизнесе, в мире тестирования продуктов и прочего, не пугаются, когда данные оказываются в беспорядке. Они решают: «Ну что ж, выяснять, что люди думают про колу, не так просто. Может быть, мы где-то ошиблись в процессе. Давайте просто сделаем научное предположение». И они просто тыкают в график и принимают 10%, ровно посередине. Но Говарда так просто не унять. Говард — человек определённых интеллектуальных стандартов. Такой вариант был для него недостаточно хорош, и эта задача терзала его годами. Он обдумывал её и спрашивал себя: «Что не так? Почему мы не получили результат в эксперименте с диетической «Пепси»?»

 

03:43

Однажды он сидел в закусочной в Уайт Плейнз, готовый пуститься выдумывать что-нибудь для «Нескафе». И вдруг, словно молния, к нему пришёл ответ. Он заключался в том, что когда они анализировали данные по диетической «Пепси», они задавали себе неправильный вопрос. Они искали одну идеальную «Пепси», а следовало искать несколько идеальных «Пепси». Поверьте мне. Это было громадное открытие. Это было одним из самых выдающихся достижений во всей науке о питании. И Говард незамедлительно отправился в дорогу, он участвовал в конференциях по всей стране, выходил и говорил: «Вы искали одну идеальную «Пепси». Вы ошибались. Вам надо было искать несколько идеальных «Пепси».

 

 

А люди смотрели на него пустым взглядом и говорили: «О чем вы? Это безумие». И продолжали: «Уходите! Следующий!» Он пытался получить заказы, но никто его не нанимал — он был одержим и говорил об этом, говорил, говорил. Говард любит еврейскую поговорку «для червяка, живущего в хрене, весь мир — это хрен». Это было его «хреном». (Смех) Он был одержим этим!

 

04:41

И, наконец, у него получилось. К нему пришли представители компании «Власик» и сказали: «Доктор Московиц, мы хотим выпустить идеальный сорт маринованных огурчиков». И он ответил: «Не бывает одного идеального сорта, есть только идеальные сорта». И, вернувшись к ним, он сказал: «Вам нужно не просто улучшить ваш обычный сорт, вам нужно создать пикантные огурчики». Так мы получили пикантные маринованные огурчики. Потом к нему пришел следующий клиент, из компании «Кэмпбелл суп». И это событие было ещё значительней.

 

05:11

Фактически, работа для «Кэмпбелл суп» создала Говарду репутацию. «Кэмпбелл» выпускала соус «Прего», и «Прего» в начале 80-х проигрывал «Рагу», который был лидирующим соусом для спагетти 70-х и 80-х годов. Вообще-то в индустрии — не знаю, важны ли вам эти детали и насколько мне стоит в них погружаться, но с технической точки зрения — помимо всего прочего — томатный соус «Прего» лучше, чем «Рагу». Качество томатной пасты гораздо выше, сочетание специй значительно лучше, он лучше держится на поверхности спагетти. В 70-х был проведён знаменитый тест для «Рагу» и «Прего». Перед вами тарелка спагетти и вы поливаете их соусом, не так ли? Весь «Рагу» стекал вниз, а «Прего» оставался сверху. Это называется «держаться на спагетти». Но несмотря на то, что он лучше держался на спагетти и качество томатной пасты было лучше, «Прего» проигрывал.

 

06:01

Поэтому они пришли к Говарду и попросили помочь. Говард посмотрел на их продукцию и сказал: «У вас тут общество мёртвых помидоров. Вот что я хочу сделать». Вместе с кухней «Кэмпбелл суп» он сделал 45 разнообразных соусов для спагетти. И разграничил их всеми возможными способами, которыми только можно разграничить томатные соусы. По сладости, количеству чеснока, терпкости, кислоте, по наличию видимых твёрдых кусочков — мой любимый термин в индустрии соусов для спагетти. (Смех)

 

Он разграничил соусы всеми мыслимыми способами, которыми только можно. Затем он взял всю эту кучу из 45 соусов для спагетти и отправился в дорогу...

 

Он был в Нью-Йорке, Чикаго, Джексонвилле, Лос-Анджелесе. Он приводил людей толпами (разг.) в большие залы. Усаживал их на два часа и давал им на протяжении этих двух часов по десять тарелок. Десять маленьких тарелок спагетти с разными соусами в каждой. И после того, как они съедали каждую тарелку, они должны были оценить от 0 до 100, насколько хорош был соус по их мнению.

 

 

06:59

По окончании этого процесса, который длился месяцами, у него была гора данных о том, что американцы думают про соус для спагетти. Затем он проанализировал данные. Итак, искал ли он самый популярный сорт соуса?

Нет! Говард не верит, что такое бывает. Вместо этого он посмотрел на данные и сказал: «Давайте проверим, сможем ли мы распределить эти непохожие данные по группам.

Посмотрим, сходятся ли они вокруг определённых идей». И действительно, если вы сядете и проанализируете все данные о соусах, вы увидите, что все американцы попадают в одну из трёх групп. Люди, которые любят обычный соус, люди, которые любят острый соус, и люди, которые любят густой соус с твёрдыми кусочками.

 

 

 

07:45

И среди этих трёх фактов третий был самым показательным. Потому что в то время, в начале 80-х, если бы вы оказались в магазине, вы бы не нашли густой соус с твёрдыми кусочками. Представители «Прего», обратившись к Говарду, удивились: «Вы говорите, что треть американцев жаждет густого соуса для спагетти с кусочками, но никто еще не удовлетворил их потребность?»

И он сказал: «Да!»

08:10

(Смех)

Представители «Прего» вернулись к себе, полностью переосмыслили свой соус для спагетти и выступили с партией соусов с твёрдыми кусочками, которая незамедлительно и полностью захватила бизнес соусов для спагетти в стране. И в течение следующих 10 лет они заработали 600 миллионов долларов на партии соусов с кусочками.

 

08:30

А все остальные в этой отрасли, посмотрев на то, что сделал Говард, вскричали: «Боже мой! Мы мыслили совершенно неправильно!» И с этого момента у нас появилось 7 разных видов уксуса, 14 сортов горчицы и 71 вид оливкового масла, и в конце концов даже «Рагу» наняла Говарда, и Говард сделал для неё ровно то же самое, что и для «Прего». И сегодня если вы пойдёте в магазин, в очень хороший, и посчитаете, сколько там соусов «Рагу», — вы знаете, сколько их там? 36! В шести видах: Сырный, Лёгкий, Пикантный, Сочный и насыщенный, Традиции Старого Света, Густой Огородный.

 

 

 

(Смех)

Это заслуга Говарда.

Его подарок американскому народу.

09:21

Итак, почему это важно?

Это действительно крайне важно. Я объясню, почему. Говард в корне изменил представление пищевой промышленности о том, как сделать вас счастливыми. В пищевой промышленности предположение номер один было таким: чтобы выяснить, что именно люди хотят съесть, что сделает их счастливыми, нужно спросить их. И долгие годы «Рагу» и «Прего» проводили опросы контрольных групп, усаживали людей и спрашивали: «Что вы хотите получить от соуса для спагетти?

Расскажите, чего бы вы хотели». И за всё это время — 20, 30 лет — в течение всех этих опросов никто ни разу не сказал, что хочет густой соус с кусочками. Несмотря на то, что по крайней мере треть в глубине души хотела.

 

 

 

 

(Смех)

10:03

Люди не знают, чего хотят! Не так ли? Как любит говорить Говард: «Разум не ведает, чего язык хочет». Это загадка!

 

(Смех)

10:23

И решающе важный шаг в понимании наших собственных желаний и вкусов в осознании того, что мы не всегда можем объяснить, чего мы в глубине души хотим. Например, если я спрошу всех вас, каким бы вы хотели кофе, знаете, чтобы вы сказали? Каждый из вас сказал бы: «Я хочу крепкий насыщенный кофе тёмной обжарки». Люди всегда так отвечают, если спросить, каким они хотят кофе. Что вы любите? Крепкий насыщенный кофе тёмной обжарки. Но каков процент действительно любящих крепкий насыщенный кофе тёмной обжарки? Согласно Говарду где-то между 25% и 27%. Большинство из вас любит слабый кофе с молоком. Но если вас спросят, вы никогда не скажете: «Хочу слабый кофе с молоком». (Смех)

10:52

Итак, это первая вещь, которую сделал Говард. Вторая вещь, сделанная Говардом: он заставил нас осознать — это ещё один решающий момент — он заставил нас осознать важность того, что он любит называть горизонтальной сегментацией. Почему это важно? Это важно потому, что как мыслила пищевая промышленность до Говарда? Чем они были одержимы в начале 80-х? Они были одержимы горчицей. В частности, историей горчицы «Грей Пупон». Раньше было две марки горчицы: «Френчс» и «Голденс». Что это было? Жёлтая горчица. Что входит в жёлтую горчицу? Семена жёлтой горчицы, куркума и паприка. Горчица была такой. Компания «Грей Пупон» выпустила дижонскую горчицу. Семена более острой коричневой горчицы, белое вино, обжигающая нос острота, более тонкий аромат. И что они делают? Они кладут ее в маленькую стеклянную банку с дивной глянцевой этикеткой, которая выглядит как французская, хоть сделана в Окснарде, Калифорния.

 

 

(Смех)

11:50

И вместо того, чтобы брать полтора доллара за 225-граммовую бутылку, как в случае с «Френчс» и «Голденс», они решили брать 4 доллара. А потом была реклама, помните? С парнем в Роллс-Ройсе, который ест «Грей Пупон», когда останавливается второй Роллс-Ройс и его пассажир спрашивает: «У вас есть «Грей Пупон»?» И после того, как они сделали это, «Грей Пупон» взмывает. Захватывает горчичный бизнес.

12:10

Но урок, который все получили, был в том, что способ сделать людей счастливыми это дать им нечто более дорогое, нечто, к чему нужно стремиться. Верно? Заставить их отвернуться от того, что они думали, им нравится, и потянуться к чему-то, что выше в горчичной иерархии.

 

 

12:32

Лучшая горчица! Более дорогая горчица! Горчица большей изысканности, совершенства и содержания. Говард указал на это и сказал, что это неверно. Иерархии горчицы не существует. Горчица, равно как и томатный соус, находится на горизонтальной плоскости. Не бывает хорошей или плохой горчицы. Нет идеальной или неидеальной горчицы. Бывают только разные виды горчицы, которые подходят разным людям. Он в корне реформировал наши представления о вкусе. И за это тоже нам следует благодарить Говарда Московица.

 

 

13:06

Третье, что сделал Говард, и, возможно, наиболее важное: он противостоял понятию «платонического блюда».

 

(Смех)

13:13

Что я имею в виду?

 

 

Долгое время в пищевой промышленности считалось, что есть только один, правильный способ приготовить блюдо. Вы идете в «Ше Панисс», там вам подают сашими из красного луциана с зажаренными тыквенными семечками в каком-то соусе. Вам не предлагают пять вариантов соуса, не так ли? Вас не спрашивают, хотите ли вы густой соус с кусочками или что-то ещё, — нет! Вы просто получаете соус. Почему? Потому что у шеф-повара в «Ше Панисс» свое платоническое представление сашими из красного луциана.

"Так должно быть." Поэтому он готовит этим способом снова и снова, а если вы возразите, он скажет: «Знаете, что? Вы неправы! Это лучший способ, так должно быть в этом ресторане».

 

13:59

Та же идея заполонила и коммерческую пищевую промышленность. У них было представление, платоническое представление томатного соуса. Откуда оно взялось? Из Италии. Каков итальянский соус? Он растёртый и жидкий. Культура жидкого томатного соуса. Когда мы говорили о подлинном томатном соусе в 70-х, мы имели в виду итальянский соус. Мы говорили о первых рагу. В котором не было видимых твёрдых кусочков, правда? Который был жидким, так что если положить немного сверху, то он стечёт под спагетти. Вот что это было. Но почему мы были привязаны к нему? Потому что мы думали, что для того, чтобы сделать людей счастливыми, нужно предоставить им наиболее традиционный томатный соус. Это раз, и два — мы думали, что если мы предложим традиционный томатный соус, люди примут его. И он понравится максимальному количеству людей.

 

14:50

А причина, по который мы так думали, — иначе говоря, люди в кулинарном мире искали общих понятий в готовке. Они искали единственный способ накормить нас всех. Для них это хороший повод быть одержимыми идеей общих понятий, потому что вся наука 19-го и большой части 20-го веков была одержима общими понятиями. Психологи, специалисты в области медицины, экономисты — все были заинтересованы в том, чтобы обнаружить правила, управляющие поведением всех нас. Но всё изменилось, не так ли? В чём важный научный переворот за последние 10-15 лет?

В движении от поиска общих понятий к пониманию изменчивости.

В медицине мы необязательно хотим знать, как именно действует рак, мы хотим знать, чем ваш рак отличается от моего.

Полагаю, мой рак отличается от вашего. Генетика открыла дверь к исследованию человеческой изменчивости. А Говард Московиц говорил, что такой же переворот должен произойти в мире томатного соуса. И за это мы обязаны поблагодарить его.

 

15:55

Дам вам последний пример изменчивости, это — о, прошу прощения. Говард не только верил в это, но и сделал второй шаг, сказав, что когда мы преследуем общие правила для пищи, мы не просто совершаем ошибку, мы на самом деле наносим себе тяжелый ущерб. Пример, который он использовал, был кофе. Он много работал над кофе вместе с «Нескафе». Если бы я попросил вас придумать марку кофе: тип кофе, способ приготовления, который бы понравился всем, а потом попросил бы вас оценить этот кофе, средняя оценка кофе в этой комнате была бы около 60 по шкале от 0 до 100. Однако это позволило бы мне разделить вас на группы, может, три или четыре кофейные группы, и я смог бы приготовить кофе для каждой из отдельных групп, так что оценка возросла бы от 60 до 75 или 78.

 

Отличие между кофе с оценкой 60 и кофе с оценкой 78 это отличие между кофе, который заставит вас поморщиться, и кофе, который сделает вас безумно счастливыми.

 

 

16:53

Это последний и, я думаю, самый изящный урок Говарда Московица. Принимая непохожесть людей, мы найдём более верный путь к настоящему счастью.

 

Спасибо.

(Апплодисменты)