gallery/1 logo (site)_em_englishmag (max) rgb

Choose your language

Cart (0)
EnglishMag logo
choose language

You're not at your best when you're stressed. In fact, your brain has evolved over millennia to release cortisol in stressful situations, inhibiting rational, logical thinking but potentially helping you survive, say, being attacked by a lion. Neuroscientist Daniel Levitin thinks there's a way to avoid making critical mistakes in stressful situations, when your thinking becomes clouded -- the pre-mortem. "We all are going to fail now and then," he says. "The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be."

TEDx Why do we need to use smartphones all the time?

gallery/знак первода под вопросом comic sans

Вы не вы, когда под стрессом. Фактически, ваш мозг эволюционировался на протяжении тысячелетий, чтобы высвободить кортизол в стрессовых ситуациях, подавляя рациональное, логическое мышление, но потенциально помогая вам выжить, скажем,  если нападёт лев. Нейробиолог Даниэль Левитин считает, что есть способ избежать критических ошибок в стрессовых ситуациях, когда ваше мышление становится омраченным.

00:13

A few years ago, I broke into my own house. I had just driven home, it was around midnight in the dead of Montreal winter, I had been visiting my friend, Jeff, across town, and the thermometer on the front porch read minus 40 degrees -- and don't bother asking if that's Celsius or Fahrenheit, minus 40 is where the two scales meet -- it was very cold. And as I stood on the front porch fumbling in my pockets, I found I didn't have my keys. In fact, I could see them through the window, lying on the dining room table where I had left them. So I quickly ran around and tried all the other doors and windows, and they were locked tight. I thought about calling a locksmith -- at least I had my cellphone, but at midnight, it could take a while for a locksmith to show up, and it was cold. I couldn't go back to my friend Jeff's house for the night because I had an early flight to Europe the next morning, and I needed to get my passport and my suitcase.

01:08          

So, desperate and freezing cold, I found a large rock and I broke through the basement window, cleared out the shards of glass, I crawled through, I found a piece of cardboard and taped it up over the opening, figuring that in the morning, on the way to the airport, I could call my contractor and ask him to fix it. This was going to be expensive, but probably no more expensive than a middle-of-the-night locksmith, so I figured, under the circumstances, I was coming out even.

01:36

Now, I'm a neuroscientist by training and I know a little bit about how the brain performs under stress. It releases cortisol that raises your heart rate, it modulates adrenaline levels and it clouds your thinking. So the next morning, when I woke up on too little sleep, worrying about the hole in the window, and a mental note that I had to call my contractor, and the freezing temperatures, and the meetings I had upcoming in Europe, and, you know, with all the cortisol in my brain, my thinking was cloudy, but I didn't know it was cloudy because my thinking was cloudy.

02:13

(Laughter)

02:15

And it wasn't until I got to the airport check-in counter, that I realized I didn't have my passport.

02:20

(Laughter)

02:22

So I raced home in the snow and ice, 40 minutes, got my passport, raced back to the airport, I made it just in time, but they had given away my seat to someone else, so I got stuck in the back of the plane, next to the bathrooms, in a seat that wouldn't recline, on an eight-hour flight. Well, I had a lot of time to think during those eight hours and no sleep.

02:43

(Laughter)

02:44

And I started wondering, are there things that I can do, systems that I can put into place, that will prevent bad things from happening? Or at least if bad things happen, will minimize the likelihood of it being a total catastrophe. So I started thinking about that, but my thoughts didn't crystallize until about a month later. I was having dinner with my colleague, Danny Kahneman, the Nobel Prize winner, and I somewhat embarrassedly told him about having broken my window, and, you know, forgotten my passport, and Danny shared with me that he'd been practicing something called prospective hindsight.

03:19

(Laughter)

03:20

It's something that he had gotten from the psychologist Gary Klein, who had written about it a few years before, also called the pre-mortem. Now, you all know what the postmortem is. Whenever there's a disaster, a team of experts come in and they try to figure out what went wrong, right? Well, in the pre-mortem, Danny explained, you look ahead and you try to figure out all the things that could go wrong, and then you try to figure out what you can do to prevent those things from happening, or to minimize the damage.

03:48

So what I want to talk to you about today are some of the things we can do in the form of a pre-mortem*. Some of them are obvious, some of them are not so obvious. I'll start with the obvious ones.

03:59

Around the home, designate* a place for things that are easily lost. Now, this sounds like common sense, and it is, but there's a lot of science to back this up*, based on the way our spatial memory works. There's a structure in the brain called the hippocampus, that evolved over tens of thousands of years, to keep track of the locations of important things -- where the well is, where fish can be found, that stand of fruit trees, where the friendly and enemy tribes live. The hippocampus is the part of the brain that in London taxicab drivers becomes enlarged. It's the part of the brain that allows squirrels to find their nuts. And if you're wondering, somebody actually did the experiment where they cut off the olfactory sense of the squirrels, and they could still find their nuts. They weren't using smell, they were using the hippocampus, this exquisitely evolved mechanism in the brain for finding things. But it's really good for things that don't move around much, not so good for things that move around. So this is why we lose car keys and reading glasses and passports. So in the home, designate a spot for your keys -- a hook by the door, maybe a decorative bowl. For your passport, a particular drawer. For your reading glasses, a particular table. If you designate a spot and you're scrupulous about it, your things will always be there when you look for them.

05:24

What about travel? Take a cell phone picture of your credit cards, your driver's license, your passport, mail it to yourself so it's in the cloud. If these things are lost or stolen, you can facilitate replacement.

05:37

Now these are some rather obvious things. Remember, when you're under stress, the brain releases cortisol. Cortisol is toxic, and it causes cloudy thinking. So part of the practice of the pre-mortem is to recognize that under stress you're not going to be at your best, and you should put systems in place.

05:55

And there's perhaps no more stressful a situation than when you're confronted with a medical decision to make. And at some point, all of us are going to be in that position, where we have to make a very important decision about the future of our medical care or that of a loved one, to help them with a decision.

06:12

And so I want to talk about that. And I'm going to talk about a very particular medical condition. But this stands as a proxy for all kinds of medical decision-making, and indeed for financial decision-making, and social decision-making -- any kind of decision you have to make that would benefit from a rational assessment of the facts.

06:31

So suppose you go to your doctor and the doctor says, "I just got your lab work back, your cholesterol's a little high." Now, you all know that high cholesterol is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attack, stroke. And so you're thinking having high cholesterol isn't the best thing, and so the doctor says, "You know, I'd like to give you a drug that will help you lower your cholesterol, a statin." And you've probably heard of statins, you know that they're among the most widely prescribed drugs in the world today, you probably even know people who take them. And so you're thinking, "Yeah! Give me the statin."

07:07

But there's a question you should ask at this point, a statistic you should ask for that most doctors don't like talking about, and pharmaceutical companies like talking about even less. It's for the number needed to treat. Now, what is this, the NNT? It's the number of people that need to take a drug or undergo a surgery or any medical procedure before one person is helped. And you're thinking, what kind of crazy statistic is that? The number should be one. My doctor wouldn't prescribe something to me if it's not going to help. But actually, medical practice doesn't work that way. And it's not the doctor's fault, if it's anybody's fault, it's the fault of scientists like me. We haven't figured out the underlying mechanisms well enough. But GlaxoSmithKline estimates that 90 percent of the drugs work in only 30 to 50 percent of the people. So the number needed to treat for the most widely prescribed statin, what do you suppose it is? How many people have to take it before one person is helped? 300. This is according to research by research practitioners Jerome Groopman and Pamela Hartzband, independently confirmed by Bloomberg.com. I ran through the numbers myself. 300 people have to take the drug for a year before one heart attack, stroke or other adverse event is prevented.

08:24

Now you're probably thinking, "Well, OK, one in 300 chance of lowering my cholesterol. Why not, doc? Give me the prescription anyway." But you should ask at this point for another statistic, and that is, "Tell me about the side effects." Right? So for this particular drug, the side effects occur in five percent of the patients. And they include terrible things -- debilitating muscle and joint pain, gastrointestinal distress -- but now you're thinking, "Five percent, not very likely it's going to happen to me, I'll still take the drug." But wait a minute. Remember under stress you're not thinking clearly. So think about how you're going to work through this ahead of time, so you don't have to manufacture the chain of reasoning on the spot. 300 people take the drug, right? One person's helped, five percent of those 300 have side effects, that's 15 people. You're 15 times more likely to be harmed by the drug than you are to be helped by the drug.

09:16

Now, I'm not saying whether you should take the statin or not. I'm just saying you should have this conversation with your doctor. Medical ethics requires it, it's part of the principle of informed consent. You have the right to have access to this kind of information to begin the conversation about whether you want to take the risks or not.

09:33

Now you might be thinking I've pulled this number out of the air for shock value, but in fact it's rather typical, this number needed to treat. For the most widely performed surgery on men over the age of 50, removal of the prostate for cancer, the number needed to treat is 49. That's right, 49 surgeries are done for every one person who's helped. And the side effects in that case occur in 50 percent of the patients. They include impotence, erectile dysfunction, urinary incontinence, rectal tearing, fecal incontinence. And if you're lucky, and you're one of the 50 percent who has these, they'll only last for a year or two.

10:12

So the idea of the pre-mortem is to think ahead of time to the questions that you might be able to ask that will push the conversation forward. You don't want to have to manufacture all of this on the spot. And you also want to think about things like quality of life. Because you have a choice oftentimes, do you I want a shorter life that's pain-free, or a longer life that might have a great deal of pain towards the end? These are things to talk about and think about now, with your family and your loved ones. You might change your mind in the heat of the moment, but at least you're practiced with this kind of thinking.

10:45

Remember, our brain under stress releases cortisol, and one of the things that happens at that moment is a whole bunch on systems shut down. There's an evolutionary reason for this. Face-to-face with a predator, you don't need your digestive system, or your libido, or your immune system, because if you're body is expending metabolism on those things and you don't react quickly, you might become the lion's lunch, and then none of those things matter. Unfortunately, one of the things that goes out the window during those times of stress is rational, logical thinking, as Danny Kahneman and his colleagues have shown. So we need to train ourselves to think ahead to these kinds of situations.

11:27

I think the important point here is recognizing that all of us are flawed. We all are going to fail now and then. The idea is to think ahead to what those failures might be, to put systems in place that will help minimize the damage, or to prevent the bad things from happening in the first place.

11:48

Getting back to that snowy night in Montreal, when I got back from my trip, I had my contractor install a combination lock next to the door, with a key to the front door in it, an easy to remember combination. And I have to admit, I still have piles of mail that haven't been sorted, and piles of emails that I haven't gone through. So I'm not completely organized, but I see organization as a gradual process, and I'm getting there.

12:13

Thank you very much.

12:14

(Applause)

00:13

Несколько лет назад я вломился в свой собственный дом. Я только приехал. Было около полуночи глубокой зимой в Монреале. Я навещал своего друга Джеффа на другом конце города. На градуснике на крыльце было –40°. Нет смысла спрашивать, по Цельсию или по Фаренгейту, –40 — это одно и то же по любой шкале. Стоял лютый холод. Стоя на крыльце и шаря по карманам, я понял, что ключа у меня не было. Я даже мог его видеть через окно на столе в столовой — там, где я его оставил. Я быстро обежал дом, пробуя открыть другие двери или окна, но все они были заперты. Я подумал позвонить слесарю — телефон-то у меня был, — но посреди ночи слесаря пришлось бы долго ждать, а было холодно. И к Джеффу я не мог поехать переночевать, так как рано утром у меня был вылет в Европу и мне нужны были мой паспорт и чемодан.




01:08

Промёрзший насквозь и отчаявшийся, я нашёл большущий камень и разбил им окно подвала. Убрал осколки стекла, забрался внутрь, нашёл кусок картона и закрыл им дыру, решив, что утром по дороге в аэропорт позвоню своему мастеру и попрошу его починить окно. Будет дорого стоить, но скорее всего, не дороже, чем услуги слесаря в полночь. Так что в сложившихся обстоятельствах по деньгам нет разницы.



01:36

По образованию я невролог и знаком с тем, как мозг работает в условиях стресса. Он вырабатывает кортизол, который ускоряет сердцебиение, изменяет уровень адреналина в крови и затуманивает мышление. На следующее утро, поспав совсем немного, переживая о разбитом окне, мысленно отметив себе позвонить мастеру, с морозом за окном, приближающейся встречей в Европе — со всем этим кортизолом в мозге моё мышление было затуманено, но я не отдавал себе в этом отчёта, так как моё мышление было затуманено.



02:13

(Смех)

02:15

И только у стойки регистрации в аэропорту я понял, что забыл свой паспорт.

02:20

(Смех)

02:22

Я помчался обратно — это заняло 40 минут — сквозь снег и гололедицу, взял паспорт — и пулей в аэропорт. Я вернулся вовремя, но моё место уже кому-то отдали, поэтому я оказался в хвосте самолёта у туалета, в кресле с неоткидывающейся спинкой на все восемь часов полёта. У меня было много времени на размышление в течение этих восьми часов без сна.

02:43

(Смех)

02:44

Я задумался: есть ли какие-то практики, системы, которые я мог бы применить, чтобы со мной не случались неприятности?Или, уж если случились, то по минимуму, не оборачиваясь катастрофой. Я стал над этим размышлять, но решение пришло только месяц спустя. Я обедал с моим коллегой Дэнни Канеманом, лауреатом Нобелевской премии, и со стыдом признался ему в том, как разбил окно дома, а потом ещё и забыл свой паспорт, и Дэнни рассказал мне, что он практикует нечто под названием «проспективный взгляд в прошлое».



03:19

(Смех)

03:20

Он узнал об этом от психолога Гэри Клейна, написавшего пару лет назад об этой методике, известной также как премортем.Все знают, что такое постмортем. Когда случается катастрофа, приезжает команда специалистов и пытается определить, что пошло не так. В практике премортем, объяснил Дэнни, ты заранее планируешь, что может пойти не так, а затем определяешь, что ты сам можешь сделать, чтобы это предотвратить или минимизировать ущерб.



03:48

И сегодня я хочу рассказать вам о том, как можно действовать в рамках премортема. Некоторые из этих действий очевидны, некоторые — нет. Начнём с очевидных.

03:59

Дома выберите место для вещей, которые легко потерять. Звучит логично, и это так, но всё это научно доказано и основано на механизме работы пространственной памяти. В мозге есть такая зона, гиппокамп, которая развивалась на протяжении десятков тысячелетий, чтобы отслеживать местоположение важных предметов: где находится родник, где можно найти рыбу,где находятся фруктовые деревья, где живут дружественные и враждебные племена. Гиппокамп — та часть мозга, которая у лондонских водителей такси невероятно увеличена. Он помогает бéлкам отыскать орехи. И если вам интересно, был проведён эксперимент, в котором бéлок лишали обоняния, а они всё же могли найти орехи. Их вело не обоняние, а гиппокамп — этот великолепно развитый механизм для поиска вещей в пространстве. Но он больше подходит для поиска объектов, не изменяющих своего местоположения, и не так уж удачно справляется с поиском изменяющих. Это причина того, что порой мы теряем ключи, очки или паспорт. Поэтому дома определите место для ключей — крючок на двери или, может, декоративную чашу. Для паспорта выберите конкретную полку, для очков — определённый стол. Если определить место и соблюдать его,нужная вещь всегда будет там, когда потребуется.



05:24

Как насчёт путешествий? Сделайте фото на мобильник своей кредитной карты, водительских прав, паспорта, отправьте их себе на почту. При потере или краже этих документов их будет легче восстановить.

05:37

Эти приёмы из разряда очевидных. Помните, под действием стресса мозг вырабатывает кортизол. Кортизол токсичен и затуманивает мышление. Поэтому одна из практик премортема — осознать, что в стрессовом состоянии вы действуете не лучшим образом, а значит, нужна система.


05:55

И пожалуй, нет более стрессовой ситуации, чем когда приходится принять медицинское решение. Рано или поздно каждый из нас оказывается в таком положении, когда нужно принять очень важное решение о своём здоровье или здоровье близких,помочь им принять такое решение.


06:12

Поговорим об этом. Рассмотрим весьма конкретную медицинскую ситуацию, но она обобщает в себе все виды медицинских решений, а также наших финансовых, социальных решений — любых решений, которые вы принимаете и которые станут лучше при рациональной оценке фактов.


06:31

Представим, что вы пришли к врачу, и он говорит: «Пришли результаты анализов. Ваш уровень холестерина повышен». Всем известно, что высокий уровень холестерина означает повышенный риск сердечно-сосудистых заболеваний, инсульта и инфаркта. Вам понятно, что высокий уровень холестерина — плохо. А доктор продолжает: «Я думаю прописать вам лекарство,которое поможет понизить уровень холестерина — статин». Вы, наверное, слышали о статине — одно из самых распространённых лекарств в мире на сегодняшний день. Может, вы даже знакомы с теми, кто его принимает. Вы решаете: «Хорошо, прописывайте статин».

07:06

Но тут вам бы стоило задаться вопросом, уточнить число, о котором врачи не любят говорить, а уж фармацевтические компании — и того меньше: количество нуждающихся в лечении (КНЛ). Что такое КНЛ? Это количество людей, которые должны принять лекарство, пройти хирургическую операцию или другую медицинскую процедуру, чтобы хотя бы один из них был излечен. Вы думаете: что за странная статистика? Разве оно не равно 1? Врач не станет назначать мне лекарство,которое не поможет. Однако медицина так не работает. И в том нет вины доктора. Если кто и виноват, так это учёные вроде меня. Мы до сих пор не разобрались с базовыми механизмами. По оценке компании GlaxoSmithKline, 90% лекарств срабатывают только для 30—50% пациентов. Так каково же, по вашему мнению, число нуждающихся в лечении для статина?Скольким людям надо его принять, чтобы один излечился? 300. Таково это число, согласно исследованию специалистов-практиков Джерома Групмана и Памелы Харцбанд, независимо подтверждённое агентством Bloomberg. Я и сам всё перепроверил. 300 человек должны принимать статин на протяжении года, чтобы предотвратить один инсульт, инфаркт или другое несчастье.



08:24

Вы, вероятно, думаете: «Что ж, 1 шанс из 300, что мой холестерол понизится. Почему бы и нет? Всё равно прописывайте». Но тут нужно расспросить о другой статистике, а именно: «Каковы побочные действия?» От этого лекарства побочные действия возникают у 5% пациентов. А среди них — ужасающие вещи: изнуряющая боль в мышцах и суставах, желудочно-кишечные расстройства. Но вы говорите себе: «5%. Маловероятно, что это буду я. Всё равно буду принимать». Но подождите-ка.Помните, во время стресса вы не мыслите ясно. Каким было бы ваше умозаключение, подготовьтесь вы заранее, чтобы не выстраивать цепь рассуждений на месте? 300 человек приняли лекарство. Одному оно помогло. У 5% из 300 пациентов проявились побочные эффекты, а это 15 человек. У вас в 15 раз больше шансов, что лекарство вам навредит, чем поможет.



09:16

Я не говорю вам, принимать статин или нет. Я только обращаю ваше внимание на важность этого разговора с врачом. Этого требует медицинская этика. Это и есть информированное согласие. У вас есть право доступа к подобного рода информации,чтобы задуматься о том, готовы ли вы к таким рискам или нет.


09:33

Вам может казаться, что я взял это число КНЛ с потолка, чтобы шокировать вас, но на самом деле оно типично, данное число нуждающихся в лечении. Для самой часто проводимой операции на мужчинах в возрасте старше 50 лет, удаления простаты при раке, это число равно 49. Всё верно, 49 операций, чтобы помочь одному человеку. А побочные эффекты возникают в данном случае у 50% пациентов. Среди них импотенция, эректильная дисфункция, недержание мочи, разрыв прямой кишки,недержание кала. И если вам «повезло» быть среди этих 50%, длиться эти побочные действия будут «всего» год или два.


10:12

Итак, смысл премортема — обдумывать заранее вопросы, которые стóит задать, чтобы выстроить беседу грамотно. Думать о них на месте — не в ваших интересах. Имеет смысл спросить и о качестве жизни. Ведь зачастую выбор есть: вас больше устроит короткая, но безболезненная жизнь или долгая жизнь, но с сильными болями под конец? Об этих вещах нужно думать и говорить сейчас — с семьёй и любимыми. Может, вы сгоряча и передумаете, но вы хотя бы задумались над этими вопросами.



10:45

Помните, в стрессовой ситуации мозг вырабатывает кортизол, и тогда, в тот же самый момент, многие системы прекращают работать. Тому есть обоснованная эволюцией причина. Когда вы сталкиваетесь с хищником, вам не нужны ни система пищеварения, ни половой инстинкт, ни иммунная система, ведь если тело расходует на всё это метаболизм, а вы не отреагируете мгновенно, то можете стать обедом льва, и тогда ничто из этого уже не важно. К сожалению, одной из систем, отметаемых при стрессе, является и рациональное, логическое мышление, как показали Дэнни Канеман и его коллеги.Поэтому нам нужно научиться продумывать вещи заранее для подобных ситуаций.


11:27

Думаю, важно также осознавать, что все мы несовершенны. Время от времени что-то будет не получаться. Смысл в том, чтобы продумать, какими могут быть наши промахи, внедрить систему, которая поможет минимизировать ущерб или же предотвратить плохое.


11:48

Возвращаясь к той снежной ночи в Монреале: когда я вернулся из поездки, я попросил подрядчика установить кодовый замок на двери с ключом к входной двери и простой комбинацией. Признаюсь, у меня до сих пор есть неразобранные залежи почты и куча непросмотренных электронных писем. Так что я не абсолютно организован, но я воспринимаю организованность как постепенный процесс и потихоньку достигну этого.


12:13

Большое спасибо.

12:14

(Аплодисменты)

How to stay calm when you know you'll be stressed

gallery/arrows1a up15

Listen and read the script

gallery/arrows1a down15

Vocabulary

Locksmith ['lɔksmɪθ] слесарь

Neuroscientist ['njuərə'saɪəntɪst] нейробиолог

cortisol [ˈkɔːtɪsɒl] кортизол

heart rate [hɑː(r)t reit]  – частота сердцебиения

to modulate ['mɔdjəleɪt]  регулировать , понижать частоту

likelihood ['laɪklɪhud] вероятность

prospective hindsight ['haɪndsaɪt] предполагаемый взгляд в прошлое

pre-mortem – до смерти

post mortem – посмертный

to designate ['dezɪgneɪt] выбрать; предназначать (для чего-л.)

to back sth. up – поддерживать (идею)

spatial memory – пространственная память

spatial ['speɪʃ(ə)l] ощущающий, воспринимающий пространство

to confront [kən'frʌnt] противостоять

statin – any of a group of drugs which act to reduce levels of cholesterol in the blood

to debilitate [dɪ'bɪlɪteɪt] ослаблять, уменьшать

cardiovascular [ˌkɑː(r)dɪəu'væskjulə]  system – сердечно-сосудистая система

made by Arina Onskul

gallery/please-stay-calm-and-carry-on

13,107,419 views

TEDGlobal London | September 2015

gallery/stay-calm-and-keep-listing
gallery/знак первода под вопросом comic sans